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Do you have keratosis pilaris or know someone who does? It’s a common skin condition that causes rough patches and acne-like bumps along the arms, thighs, cheeks, and buttocks. Sometimes the bumps are red, but they are usually white and don’t itch or hurt. Apparently KP happens when a protein in the skin called keratin forms hard plugs within the hair follicle. KP affects an estimated 40-50% of the adult population worldwide! For that reason, one of our readers suspected you might have some good advice on the subject. Here’s what Courtney asks…

I figured I would come directly to my favorite source to ask about my latest skin ailment. Does anyone have any good keratosis pilaris (KP) treatments? I have been using a sugar body scrub and some whipped shea butter and that has kind of helped but it is still pretty bad. 

Is exfoliation the answer? How do you treat keratosis pilaris naturally? Tell us in the comments!

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Time for a little crowdsourcing! Kari wrote to us seeking some recommendations for styling her short pixie-ish cut. Admittedly, we’re stumped. Take a look…

I have been searching for a clean hair wax/pomade/etc. that’s good for holding short pixie-ish hairstyles in place without needing oodles of hairspray. I’ve tried Rahua’s wax, Yarok’s Feed Your Do, and Josh Rosebrook Styling Cream, all to no avail. My style won’t stay put. Am I perhaps using them incorrectly, or is there a clean medium to firm hold product for short hair out there?

So some of our go-to clean hair care brands aren’t cutting it for Kari. What have you tried that you liked? Intelligent Nutrients maybe? Share in the comments!

Do you exfoliate your face? Do you use a physical exfoliator that scrubs your skin clean with ingredients that grab ahold of and sweep away goop? Or do you use a chemical exfoliator that contains something like fruit enzymes or naturally occurring alpha hydroxy acids, which dissolve and eat away the dead skin cells? Most of you who practice exfoliation will likely have strong opinions about what type is best for skin (some of you may shun it entirely), but what about the best time of day to exfoliate? That’s what one of our readers, Christine, wants to know. Here’s her question:

I am wondering if you all have an opinion on when to exfoliate your face. I have always heard that your skin is more sensitive in the morning so it is better to exfoliate at night, however I find that in most of your “Morning Routines Exposed” people seem to exfoliate in the morning. Do you have thoughts on this?

Personally, I am a morning exfoliator, and I tend to exfoliate every other day. That may be too much for sensitive skin types, but I find a light, gentle exfoliation really preps my skin for the day and gets my blood flowing. It creates a smooth canvas, so to speak, so that everything I apply afterword—from sunscreen to foundation or powder—goes on without a hitch. Three exfoliating products that are in constant rotation at my house include One Love Organics Brand New Day, May Lindstrom The Clean Dirt, and Josh Rosebrook Active Enzyme Exfoliator. I’ve listed these from the most gentle to the most intense. Another reason I exfoliate in the morning is because I oil cleanse in the evening. Exfoliating in the evening would probably invigorate my senses at a time when I’m trying to wind down.

So when do you exfoliate? Does it matter to you what time of day you do it? Why? Tell us in the comments!

Sometimes our best intentions can complicate life. (Of course I want to get up early, but I also want to stay up late! And I’ve been trying to find the time to make this loaf of bread for weeks, but… sheesh. You can relate, I’m sure.) One of our readers, Susannah, wrote to us about this very subject — bumping into logistical challenges in pursuit of health goals — and we aim to help her figure this out. We’re recruiting you, too. Here’s the challenge:

Please help! I have just started a new exercise program and aim to attend every weekday – the only downfall is I am a SWEATY SWEATY girl and all this health and fitness is ruining my hairdo. I have long, thickthickthick curly hair and I used to wash only 1-2 times a week. Now I am either forced to wash daily or wear a sweaty bun all day. I cannot forgo washing and just rinse either because I air dry my hair and that can take all night long. Dry shampoo only takes me so far because I literally have to blow dry the sweat from my hair beforehand, and I can’t really comb the dry shampoo through either because then I am left with a frizzy, yucky mess. Am I alone in this or are there other sweaty girls out there trying to get fit and have nice hair at the same time? 

What’s a lady to do? We know some of you must have already found the ideal strategy for this lifestyle conundrum. Help a sister out!

A reader named Aneta wrote in with a question we’ve often pondered ourselves: Can you suggest a natural eyeshadow primer for oily lids that actually works?

For real, though. Some of my favorite clean eyeshadows seem to just slide around and settle in creases or melt away altogether, and I know Aneta and I are not alone here. Before going clean, I personally used Urban Decay Eyeshadow Primer. Not so clean, but boy did it work. I threw the darn thing out just so I wouldn’t be tempted by its magic fixing abilities.

My current method is to apply foundation or concealer to my eyelids first. A mineral powder foundation is great for this, and right now I’m having a love affair with W3ll People Altruist Mineral Foundation applied with their Foundation and Concealer Brush. Then I apply whatever shadow I’m using, and dust a fine layer of RMS Beauty Un-Powder on top.

Have you found a natural eyeshadow primer that works? If not, what tricks do you use to keep your eyeshadow in tact and fresh? Let us know!